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Refit:  Winter 2008-2009


Winter 2008-2009 Refit | Sunday, October 5, 2008

This morning, I finished unloading what I had to.  Most of the gear was now off the boat, though a few things remained.  I unloaded all the food, drink, and toiletries to be used by us during the months ahead.

After spending a bit of time researching my options for the new forward hatch, and based upon some experience with various hatch types and styles,  I decided upon the Lewmar Ocean Series 60, a sound hatch with good features.  The 60 size, according to its dimensional drawings, would be an exact fit in the opening that I already had--one of the few times in any industry where sizing seems to be standard across manufacturers (what a concept).

One thing I really liked about this hatch was its venting feature:  the hatch can be closed and latched in such a way as to allow constant ventilation, but without allowing rainwater in.  Also, the hatch features handles that are operable from inside or outside--another feature that I was used to and wanted to keep.  Bomar's hatches rarely feature this.

To that end, I removed the decrepit old hatch from Glissando's forecabin.  This operation took about 2 minutes:  undo the mounting screws and pry the hatch loose from its sealant (silicone...yes, I made dumb choices in the past).

What's the problem with the old hatch, one might ask?  Well, the welded seam on the extruded frame broke, causing the hatch to fit improperly and not close securely.  The split seam, corroded and tight friction hinges, and generally lame construction forced the hinge screws to fail as well, exacerbating the alignment and use issues.


         

    


With the old hatch removed, and the direction for the new hatch determined, I was well on my way to knocking off one of the items on my list.  I planned to order the new hatch soon, possibly along with an interior trim package and integral screen.

In other research, I explored the options available for new wind instruments.  I was intrigued by the Tack Tick Micronet Wind System, a wireless, solar-powered device from an innovative company.  More musings to come on this later.

Finally today, I set up the dodger so that the canvas guys would have it in place when they came to template/measure/whatever for my planned modifications to incorporate removable wings.



Total time today:  1 hour

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Glissando, Pearson  Triton #381
www.triton381.com 

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